Breakdown of a Rockin’ Testimonial (And why you should never use wishy-washy “kind words”…)

July 15, 2015 by

Check this out...

"Chris is already making his clients a lot of money, bringing in more customers, and encouraging customers to spend more money, more often. Moving forward, he's only going to continue making his clients even more money. The only question is, will YOU be one of those clients?

I've worked with Chris for the last year or so, as he's developed his chops as a wealth copywriter - helping financial publishers and other marketers with wealth or ROI-driven products to sell more of said products.

He just keeps getting better. At copy, at marketing, at everything you'd want and need in helping YOU grow your business.

And here's the kicker. Some folks get to a certain point in their career where they simply rest on their laurels, content with their current level of success. Others, are always moving forward, improving, and trying to better their best. Chris is definitely the latter - committed to constant improvement, for his sake and for yours. This drive will benefit you on every project.

I seldom actually write recommendations for folks, and especially not for copywriters. But Chris gets my recommendation - and deserves it! -- Roy Furr, Sales, Marketing, and Business Growth Expert"

"Alright Chris, enough self-love... what's this all about?"

That's a pretty damn good testimonial, right?

In fact, it's the type of testimonial you should be using, whether you're selling your copywriting services or a financial newsletter.

Why?  Because the reader can't skip it.

If the reader is a potential client, the testimonial is too interesting and persuasive to just slip on over.

To prove my point, we'll break it up into 5 sections...

1) First it begins with a clear benefit to the reader.

"Chris is already making his clients a lot of money..."

If you're a financial publisher your interest is probably piqued.  You want to make a lot of money, and this guy (A.K.A. ME!) can help you achieve that goal.

2) Next, the writer legitimizes their testimonial.

"I've worked with Chris for the last year or so..."

Right now, the reader is thinking "Okay, so this guy probably knows Chris well." That alone, makes this testimonial much more believable.

3) Then it calls out the audience.

"helping financial publishers and other marketers with wealth or ROI-driven products to sell more of said products"

If you don't know anything about me, and this is the first thing you're reading, you'll immediately get a sense of what I do and whether I can help you.

4) Next, the writer is an advocate for my passion to writing great copy and helping financial publishers market their products better.

"Chris is definitely the latter - committed to constant improvement, for his sake and for yours."

Every marketer wants to work with a copywriter who is passionate about his craft and dedicates himself to constant improvement, right?  Well, we've got that covered.

5) And finally, the writer provides one hell of a "push" to get potential clients off the fence.

"I seldom actually write recommendations for folks, and especially not for copywriters. But Chris gets my recommendation - and deserves it!"

Many people in the financial industry know who Roy Furr is.  He's written for Agora divisions, InvestorPlace, Casey Research, and many others.  His recommendation carries weight.  And it's enough to kick any potential client off the fence and to approach me.

Why is this important?

It's important because you need to know what makes a good testimonial.  But even more importantly, you need to know what isn't a good testimonial.

I split them into two categories.

The former are the recommendations... like the one I've just shown you.

The latter -- the bad testimonials -- are just "kind words."

You probably can't think of even one testimonial that fits this section.

And that's exactly the problem.

You see "kind words" are wishy-washy.  There's nothing exciting about them... nothing to sway my purchasing judgement... and nothing to make me actually believe them.

I'll give you some examples...

"Your picks are really great. Keep it up."

"I appreciate your work. I won on [TICKER]."

"Great analysis, I'll be celebrating!"

There's no specifics.

No interesting ideas.

And no reason to believe them.

That's why you -- as a publisher or copywriter -- need to do your hardest to accumulate TESTIMONIALS and not "kind words."

Oh, and when you get the testimonials... place them where they matter.  For instance, the top of the page. 😉

Cheers,

Chris Wright

Wealth Copywriter

P.S. If you've been pushed off the fence and are ready to embrace my "Big Idea" copy, then click here to find out how you can work with me.

 

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